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Stainless Damascus Spork / Spoon Project
Custom made Sporks and Spoons in stainless damascus steel. Date this project went public: 01/25/09

FIRST RUN OF 12 SPOONS / SPORKS ALREADY SPOKEN FOR - THANKS FOR THE INTEREST!
Sign-in for this Project is CLOSED - All 12 spoons / sporks are now reserved. Thanks again for your incredible interest in my work!

Fully stainless high-contrast damascus sporks or spoons to your specs.

They will be 100% custom made to your specs, and even in the event of similar orders, the finished pieces will still be unique, due to my working methods and damascus patterns.

They are $280 plus shipping (currently $40 for EMS, $65 for DHL). (CONUS/Canada addresses - Other destinations will be a tad higher)

Delivery will start approximately in May 2011. As always, there's no need for a deposit or down payment.

This first run is limited to 10 sporks / spoons to make sure I'll be able to keep a reasonable waiting time.

If people ordering would like to associate with others and have me ship several items to one person so then he can ship the other spoons/sporks in the US/Europe, I'd be OK with it. I can ship several non-knife items per package, and of course I would just charge one shipping charge for the total order. We can make those arrangements when the time comes.

You can subscribe to my Newsletter to be informed about this Damascus Spork / Spoon Project, as well as the latest info on AES Custom Knives.

Order Customization

You can choose if you'd like a:

- Spork or Spoon,
- Lanyard hole.
- Overall lenght of it (up to 10")


If you're interested in other options not listed here, please email me for a quote.

  Stainless Damascus Spork / Spoon Project
Spoon Pictures
It's 9 1/2" long and for maximum contrast, I've used 304 and 420MV (Molibdenum Vanadium) - both fully stainless steels. Green handmade leather sheath.
The dark spots or lines that look out of place are not really on the actual spoon, they're just optical effects due to the curved surfaces, that are really hard to photograph.
Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon
Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   Stainless Damascus Tasting Spoon   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives
Spork Pictures
Spork prototype coming in June 2009!
AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives
Spoon Making Pictures
First six pictures are from another Tutorial I've made: Forging Stainless 304 and Stainless 420 MV
Since it's exactly the same process, I didn't see the point in taking new pics of this step. Only difference is that for this spoon, the cannister is 8" long -twice as the one pictured. Cannister is 40x40mm and the thickness is 2mm.

After making the canister, I put some kitchen paper soaked in WD40 inside. This will burn and consume the O2 inside the can, creating the reduced atmosphere needed for the welding of stainless steels. (Pictures 1 and 2)

Can filled with alternated sheets of 304 (0.3mm) and 420 MV -420 with added Molibdenum Vanadium- (0.7mm) (Picture 3)

Then I gotta weld it closed so no extra O2 gets inside. (Pictures 4, 5 and 6)

I place it in the oven at 1350C and I leave it there for about 20-25 minutes, rotating it every 5"

From now on, pictures are of the actual spoon making process.

Oven at welding temperature, ready to receive the canned steels. (Picture 7)

Welding temperature. (Picture 8)
Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon
Picture 1   Picture 2   Picture 3   Picture 4   Picture 5   Picture 6   Picture 7   Picture 8
After I flaten it with the press, I get rid of the cannister by grinding it off. (Picture 9)

Oven at forging temperature. (Picture 10)

Stainless forging temperature range. 900C - 1150C (Pictures 11 and 12)

Stretched sheet of damascus. (Picture 13)

Thicker, about 10mm, in the area where I'll make the spoon head. (Picture 14)

Drilling the damascus sheet to get the desired pattern (4mm drill bit, 2mm deep) (Picture 15)

Almost done. (Picture 16)
Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon
Picture 9   Picture 10   Picture 11   Picture 12   Picture 13   Picture 14   Picture 15   Picture 16
I keep heating to forge tempertature and flattening the piece until I reach a 4mm thickness. (Pictures 17 and 18)

I glue a template for the spoon shape on the damascus piece. (Picture 19)

And then cut it. (Picture 20)

To get the proper spoon shape, after I heat the soon-to-be-spoon, I use a modified inner bearing ring (previosly heated and pressed to an oval shape) and a hammer head with a round end. (Pictures 21 and 22)

Now this starts to look like a real spoon. (Picture 23)

Then I finish the forging to shape manually, with a smaller hammer. (Pictures 24 and 25)
Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon
Picture 17   Picture 18   Picture 19   Picture 20   Picture 21   Picture 22   Picture 23   Picture 24

After the spoon is shaped, I grind the inner part of the head with a spherical grinding stone, mounted on a bench drill. (Picture 26)

For the outter part I use regular sanding belts, mounted on a rubber adaptor on my bench grinder. (Picture 27)

And then polish the inner part with sand paper, manually. (Pictures 28 and 29)

After I get a mirror polish, I etch it in acid just like I do with all my damascus pieces. Process is shown in this other Tutorial: Etching a Maker's Mark

Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   Knifemaking - Making a Fully Stainless Damascus Spoon   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives   AES Custom Knives
Picture 25   Picture 26   Picture 27   Picture 28                

There are some concepts of forging and welding stainless steels that I'd like to talk about for a second.
Stainless steels melt at temperatures a tad lower than regular carbon steels, however, the forging temperature is substantially higher.

Stainless steels can be hot forged just like carbon steels, but since they have intrinsic characteristics and properties, in addition of the mentioned higher temperature, it's imperative that you take some particular and important meassures to achive a successful forging.

Stainless steels' thermal conductivity is lower than carbon steels'. At higher temperatures, stainless steels are harder and less plastic than carbon steels. They require about 40% more hits to achieve the same deformation.

This lack of plasticity causes the need for more heating cycles, and, as they have a "slow" thermal conductivity, these cycles should be done very slowly, to achieve a uniform temperature in the entire piece to forge.

It's better not to heat it to the direct flame, as this causes the steel to get oxidized. For this reason, as I still haven't finished my induction oven, is that I leave it thicker than needed and then I get rid of a good 1mm on each side, by grinding it off, after the piece cooled off.

It's also very important to properly measure the temperature in the oven while you're heating for forging, as if it goes lower than 900C, this can cause fissures on the steel.

Because of all of this precautions that I have to take into consideration when forging stainless steels, as well as the extra cost of the materials involved, is that I consider the cost of making this type of stainless damascus to be about as twice as making regular carbon damascus.

Order List

Spork prototype: Dtex / Robert

Spoon / Spork #11: Warut R.
  Spoon / Spork #1: Mike K. R.
Spoon / Spork #2: trainmaster / Rick
Spoon / Spork #3: Warren P.
Spoon / Spork #4: Markous / Mark
Spoon / Spork #5: mrspike / John E.
Spoon / Spork #6: Claude
Spoon / Spork #7: Bubba
Spoon / Spork #8: Kris J.
Spoon / Spork #9: Mark W.
Spoon / Spork #10: Steve H.
  Sign-in for this Project is CLOSED

All 12 spoons / sporks are now reserved.
   
 
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